What to use, RGB or CMYK

Color is created by light rays and how they are interpreted by the naked eye. It’s common knowledge that the color you see is a reflection. When light comes into contact with an object most colors within that light get absorbed, reflecting only the wavelength or color we see. but that isn’t the same when it comes to screens. That’s why it’s important to know about CMYK printing.

When you see color from a monitor or phone, the colors we see aren’t being reflected, they are created. So with that knowledge there are two types of color when it comes to design; Additive and Subtractive. Monitors and other screens use three colors in different combinations to produce every color; Making an additive color. While physical objects like prints subtract or absorb color to make subtractive color.

So it stands to reason that you would need two separate methods to create color for design.

Below you will find some tips to assist in the final production of your job. Your colors need to be calibrated for print rather than screen. If you are using an RGB mixture instead of a CMYK mixture you will see color shifts. This may result in you not being satisfied with your print job. (We are not responsible for your final product if not designed correctly for print.)

If you send us an RGB file, there is a chance that a color shift may occur. This is an unpredictable change, as the printers can translate the same color from the same file in 2 different ways during a single run, or on a second run.

How can I make sure my blues do not come out purple?

When using a blue in your design, always make sure to leave at least a 30% difference in Cyan and Magenta values. 100% cyan 100% magenta 0% yellow 0% k (Black) on screen after printing blue is close to purple in the CMYK spectrum. Remember; use a low amount o of cyan to avoid purple.

Blue is very close to purple in the CMYK spectrum. To avoid purple tones, use a low amount of magenta when using high amounts of cyan.

Example: 100% Cyan (C) 70% Magenta (M) 0% Yellow (Y) & 0% Black (K)

How do I get a “Rich Black” with CMYK printing?

Rich black is an ink mixture of solid black, 100% k, with additional CMY ink values. This results in a darker tone than black ink alone. In CMYK printing, if you create black as 100% k, the resulting black may not be rich or dark.

Tip:

100% k is lighter than a rich black and appears dark/charcoal gray , when put side by side. This applies both on screen and in print.

To get a rich black, we  recommend using 60% Cyan (C) 40% Magenta (M) 40% Yellow (Y) & 100% Black (K)

This will give you a deep, dark, rich black. Below you will find some tips to assist in the final production of your job.

Your colors need to be calibrated for print rather than screen. If you are using an RGB mixture instead of a CMYK mixture you will see color shifts. This may result in you not being satisfied with your print job. (We are not responsible for your final product if not designed correctly for print.).

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